Rural communities in the Philippines trade candles and battery-powered devices for lamps that only work with salt water. The sustainable alternative lighting project, known as Salt, has enlightened the Philippines’ most isolated and resource-poor communities with the fuel they have plenty of, salt water, in a safe and environmentally responsible way.

Salt lamp

SALt’s currency is “It’s not just a product. It is a social movement “. And they don’t lie. Lipa Aisa Mijena combines her skills as a member of the engineering department at De La Salle University and her work as a member of Greenpeace Philippines to put the lamps in the hands of the most disadvantaged communities on the islands. Citizens mainly use candles, paraffin or battery-powered lamps in their homes, which are already well known to cause fires in the house.

The salt lamp uses a solution of one glass of water mixed with two tablespoons of salt – even salt water straight from the sea – Provides 8 hours of light. The electrode of the device can last up to a year, depending on the frequency of use, and the manufacturing process has a small footprint. As the third most disaster-prone country in the world, the Philippines could really benefit from these lamps, especially during disaster recovery efforts.

“An electrolytic reaction occurs between the anodes and cathodes using brine (The water + salt), brine is acidic and acts as an electrolytic medium. “

Charging the smartphone with salt lamp

Salt lamps also have the ability to charge your smartphone and other devices, although the main goal of the company is to get these lamps to reach the rural islanders who need them the most.

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